Nasal Vaccine for Smallpox Confers High Levels of Immunity

March 12, 2008
BioPharm International Editors

A recent study conducted by scientists at NanoBio Corporation (Ann Arbor, MI) and the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) has demonstrated that their nasally delivered vaccinia vaccine can protect animals against 77 times the potentially lethal dose of smallpox, and without the safety risks of current vaccines for smallpox.

A recent study conducted by scientists at NanoBio Corporation (Ann Arbor, MI) and the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI) has demonstrated that their nasally delivered vaccinia vaccine can protect animals against 77 times the potentially lethal dose of smallpox, and without the safety risks of current vaccines for smallpox. Vaccinia virus is related to smallpox virus and builds immunity against it.

The current study in mice demonstrates that NanoBio’s killed-virus vaccine elicits a robust immune response because it delivers antigens directly to the lining of the nasal mucosa, where the virus first enters the body. Immune cells inside the nose immediately recognize the antigen and quickly build an immune response against it, a process known as “mucosal” immunity.

Animal studies indicate that NanoBio’s vaccines quickly trigger robust immunity-without adverse effects-against a wide array of viruses and bacteria, including influenza, hepatitis B, RSV, anthrax and HIV.

Developing mucosal immunity is particularly valuable in combating sexually transmitted diseases because they enter the body through mucous membranes, added James R. Baker Jr., MD, founder and chairman of NanoBio. Vaccines that are delivered to one mucosal surface, such as inside the nose, build immunity at distant mucosal surfaces as well.

NanoBio release

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