BioPharm International-08-10-2005

September 12, 2005

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Articles

August 10, 2005

Historically, the big pharmaceutical companies (Big Pharma) have sought to feed their marketing machines by manufacturing blockbuster drugs—chemical-based, one-type-fits-all products that treat chronic conditions such as heart disease or arthritis. This approach has yielded recurring revenue streams from large patient populations. In contrast, biotechnology companies typically have created protein-based drugs,or biologics, to treat acute or niche conditions and diseases. With few exceptions (such as the biotech giant Amgen), biotech companies have foregone doing the marketing and sales of their drugs themselves, and have, instead, relied on others to perform their marketing and sales functions.

Articles

August 10, 2005

The Interface of America's Antitrust and Intellectual Property Laws

Articles

August 10, 2005

Patents are litigated in the biopharmaceutical industry perhaps more often than any other form of IP

Articles

August 10, 2005

Trademark protection in the US is based on a dual system of federal and state laws.

Biopharmaceutical companies need to consider intellectual property issues early on, even at the start-up stage.

Your research and development team has just shouted "Eureka!" after long and expensive years of research, exclaiming they have developed a next-generation pain reliever. What do you do next? This article explores and suggests your next steps and identifies pertinent questions to ask a patent attorney. The focus is on intellectual property; this article does not address the myriad regulatory issues that must be resolved.