Articles by K. John Morrow, Jr., PhD - BioPharm International

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Articles by K. John Morrow, Jr., PhD

Final Word: Is Building Biotech an Economic Magic Potion?

High-tech development affects quality of life through improving education and funding resources
Apr 1, 2007

Virtually every corner of the United States (not to mention the rest of the world) seeks to build a powerful biotech presence (see www.bio.org/local/). Since the dawn of biotechnology in the mid 1970s, private venture capital, major corporations, and state and federal governments have poured hundreds of billions of dollars into the industry. Results have been mixed, in terms of benefits to local economies and products that reached the marketplace.

Building a Biotech Educational Infrastructure

Mar 22, 2007

Cities, counties, states; every political entity in our country is driving to develop a biotechnology presence in its respective region.

Success is an Orphan

Nov 29, 2006

An old saying goes, "Success has a thousand fathers; failure is an orphan."

Microrobots to Perform Eye Surgery

Jul 27, 2006

The nanotechnology vision of tiny microrobots that could move inside the body carrying out complex surgical repairs has been touted incessantly until it has become a clich?.

Final Word: The Constant Gardner Meets the China Syndrome

Perception and reality in how the public views the pharmaceutical industry
Mar 1, 2006

A powerful film will have a hundred times the impact of a touchy-feely commercial.

The Search for Cancer Diagnostic Markers: A Race Against Time

The knowledge that early detection and treatment offers the best outcome for the patient has long driven the search for effective diagnostics.
Sep 1, 2005

At this time there are no effective diagnostic tests for cancer that are rapid, economical, highly specific, and highly sensitive. This deficiency means that many cases of malignancy go undetected until long past the time of effective treatment. Much cancer research, including investigations carried out by both the academic and private sector, is focused on combining therapy and diagnostics as "theragnostics."

Book Review: Inside the FDA

A detailed account of the colorful history of an agency created to protect America's health.
Jun 1, 2005

In March of 1932, socialite and millionaire playboy Eben M. Byers died of a horrible and mysterious disease, his body corroded until his bones began to shatter apart. Strikingly handsome in his youth, by the time of his death a series of last ditch operations had eliminated the lower part of his face and reduced him to a distorted shadow of his former self. His bizarre death was the result of his addiction to a quack cure, radium-laced water.

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