Process Development: Think Like a Scientist—Behave Like a Business - Scientists should develop into leaders who are capable of determining the optimum balance between science and business. - Bio

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Process Development: Think Like a Scientist—Behave Like a Business
Scientists should develop into leaders who are capable of determining the optimum balance between science and business.


BioPharm International
Volume 20, Issue 8

PROJECT RESOURCE PLANS


Finance Department Perspective on Changes in Process Research and Development
Leveraging PD activity maps, CMC project leaders have assumed accountability for leading project resource planning and reporting, as well as for staying within project budgets, as defined by their CMC contracts. Functional-area managers are still accountable for staying within the cost center budgets that they manage. To support their efforts in this regard, modular project resource plans (PRPs) have been developed as a focal tool for cross-functional alignment with functional-area managers and resource-capacity planning systems. Since PRPs are prepopulated with data from PD activity maps, the need for customization is minimized. The PRPs also facilitate agreement between the CMC project team and the functional-area managers who own the specific resources. Use of the modular PRP process within each CMC contract stage has allowed simplicity when scaling of our planning capability, and enhanced planning accuracy.

SUMMARY

With the implementation and integration of these new business processes, organizational changes, and decision-making frameworks, Genentech has positioned PR&D for success in delivering the expanding pipeline. PD activity maps for unnamed new molecular entities (NMEs) and PRPs for existing planned NMEs can be consolidated and extrapolated to create resource-capacity models that enhance functional-area managers' ability to anticipate resource shortfalls or surpluses, move resources across functions, or justify additional hires. These spreadsheet tools and processes prepare the organization for future enterprise-wide project and resource-management systems. The organization can then pursue the ultimate goal of portfolio resource management: end-to-end balancing of resources across new and existing products to manage risk and improve returns.

In conclusion, our scientists are developing into leaders who are capable of determining the optimum balance between science and business. The perspective of the scientist offers an expansive vision of possibilities; the business perspective helps drive the selection of choices that are profitable—ultimately benefiting our patients.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Maurits Trouerbach, Ken Achacoso, Susan Smigelski, Connie Veilleux, Ka Kam, Lisa Wyatt, Qi Chen, John Joly, Amy Shen, Linda Khym, Kyle Derstine, David Chang, and Ann Lee.

Sue E. Steven, PhD, MBA, is a senior director of process development–business excellence, strategy, and training at Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA, 650.4670.5439,
.

REFERENCES

1. Oliver Wight International, Inc. The Oliver Wight ABCD checklist for operational excellence. 5th ed. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc; 2000.


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