Designing a Shorter Vertical Leg for Sanitary Steam Traps - - BioPharm International

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Designing a Shorter Vertical Leg for Sanitary Steam Traps


BioPharm International
Volume 19, Issue 9

STEAM TRAP CAPACITY

A thermostatic steam trap can be likened to a control valve with a condensate capacity (Cv) that varies from full-open to full-closed as the stem travels up and down. Manufacturers publish capacity data based on a 10 F sub-cool, which is a generally accepted benchmark for comparing traps' maximum capacity. Liquid condensate capacity is defined as in equation [1]:













where q is the flow in gal/min, P1 is the upstream condensate pressure in psia, P2 is the downstream pressure in psia, and G is the specific gravity. Therefore we solve for equation [2].













where W is the flow rate measured in lb/h, 60 is min/h and 8.337 is cold-water (25 C) density in lb/gal.

There is a limit to P2. As the condensate moves through the trap, its pressure is reduced and the hot condensate flashes. When the downstream pressure is approximately 50% of the upstream pressure, the pressure drop becomes critical. At this point the flashing steam reaches sonic velocity, which chokes off any additional flow through the steam trap. In this case the downstream pressure P2 is the vapor pressure of the flashed condensate.


Table 1. Theoretical CDS steam trap capacity (wide open Cv = 1.59; steam temperature = 20 psig).
The test trap discussed in this article is the Nicholson CDS 204 with –B bellows. It has a 5/16 in. orifice (3/4-in. inlet) with a cold water Cv of 1.59. Table 1 indicates the theoretical capacity when passing 80 C water and the published 10 F sub-cooled condensate for 20-psig steam. A theoretical capacity at a 2 F sub-cool is also shown. This calculated capacity is actually larger than the actual capacity because it assumes that the trap is fully open. At a 2 F sub-cool there is not enough temperature difference to open the trap fully, leaving the trap partially open.

SIP SYSTEM


Figure 2. Steam trap piping. Arrangement #1 has a three-way valve. Arrangement #2 for smaller systems has no valve.
SIP systems for vessels and associated piping are highly engineered systems. There are several different arrangements used by the biotech industry to purge air, heat up the vessel, and maintain a steam temperature of 121 C for a minimum of 15 min.


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